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Engineering & Applied Science

About This Page

Here you will find all the tools you need to cite your sources properly, information on avoiding plagiarism, and a link to RefWorks, which allows you to create a personalized bibliographic database. These tools will help you present your research in a professional format.

RefWorks

RefWorks is a web-based bibliography and database manager that allows you to create your own personal database by importing references from text files or online databases. You can use these references in writing your papers and automatically format the paper and the bibliography when you are ready.

You must create a personal account from a computer on the UMass Dartmouth campus network or login via the Library's proxy server if you are off-campus, but after that, the program can be used from any Internet connected computer.

Tutorial

Take the following online tutorial to learn more about when and why you cite sources.

Citing Sources: Why &  When


Tutorial: Citing Sources

Self Assessment: Citing Sources

Citation Styles

We have several citaiton manuals including MLA, APA, Chicago, APSA, and CSE. 
Contact your subject librarian or the Writing/Reading Center (x8710)  for assistance on tricky citations!

The following are a few online guides that you may find helpful. 

APA

Duke University's Citing Sources website provides general citation information for MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian and CSE.

OWL at Purdue (APA) - Find help with APA citation questions here.

FAQs about APA - This page is from the American Psychological Association to help you answer some questions about using APA.

APSA

Style Manual for Political Science - Revised in 2006, this manual is based on the Chicago Manual, 15th edition.

Chicago

Duke University's Citing Sources website provides general citation information for MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian and CSE.

CSE

Duke University's Citing Sources website provides general citation information for MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian and CSE.

CSE Library Guide - See our Library's guide for CSE citation help

MLA

MLA Library Guide - See our Library's guide for MLA, 7th edition citation help.

Duke University's Citing Sources website provides general citation information for MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian and CSE.

OWL at Purdue (MLA) - This comprehensive guide to the 6th edition gives you several examples to help you format your citations.

FAQs about MLA - This page is from the Modern Language Association to help you answer some questions about using MLA.

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property is the protection of ideas, inventions, and creations of the mind. This protection gives creators, authors, artists, and inventors the exclusive right to use the products of their imaginations for a limited period of time. The basic forms of intellectual property (also known as “IP”) are copyright, patent, trademark and trade secret.
          

Everyone is affected by IP in some fashion. Every time you drink a Coca-Cola, you are using a trademark. Every time you use a new invention, you are using a patent. Kentucky Fried Chicken (itself a trademark) claims trade secret protection for Colonel Sanders’ secret herbs and spices. And copyright impacts our daily lives with books, movies, music, and computer programs.
           

Intellectual property law in the U.S. is based on the U.S. Constitution, supplemented by statutes, administrative regulations, international treaties, and judicial decisions. Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8, of the U.S. Constitution reads: “The Congress shall have Power . . . To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” IP is truly the protection of the mind, and the protection of the imagination.
           

In addition to U.S. law, IP is also protected by international treaties. Many of these treaties are administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), a specialized agency of the United Nations. There are also a number of treaties for copyright, patent, and trademark protection that are outside of the WIPO system.
           

Computer and Internet law blurs the boundaries between the various types of intellectual property. The material on a Website may be copyrighted, while the domain name may be a trademark. Certainly cybersquatting and trademark law are related, and cybersquatting has been reported quite a bit in the news lately. Some of the web technology may be protected by a patent, and some processes are trade secrets. Nonetheless, each form of intellectual property retains its own twists and turns.

Bryan Carson
906 Cravens Library
Western Kentucky University