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Anthropology

Scholarly Articles

Scholarly Articles Are:

  • Written by scholars or researchers in the discipline
  • Peer-reviewed by other scholars or researchers in the discipline
  • Published in scholarly or peer reviewed journals

Watch the video and click the image below to learn more about scholarly journals and how to determine if a source is or is not scholarly.

 

Anatomy of a Scholarly Article (Click image to open link, then click different components of the article to learn more about them)

Reputable Non-Scholarly Articles

 

When evaluating a web source, magazine, or newspaper article keep these things in mind:

  • The author.
    • Who wrote it?
    • Can you click their name and see a bio or if they've written and published anything else?
    • Are they an expert in their field or a trained reporter or just your Uncle Gary yelling about Millennials on Facebook?
  • The website or publication.
    • Are there tons of pop up ads?
    • Does it look like it hasn't been updated since 2003?
    • Is there an "About" link that tells readers what types of content are being published and who is publishing them?
    • Is it trying to sell you anything?
  • Objectivity
    • It is okay if an article is not completely objective, just be aware of that if you intend to use it.
    • Subjectivity is not the same as propaganda. Try to familiarize yourself with these differences.
    • If you disagree with it, that doesn't immediately make it wrong. Try to be aware of your biases as you evaluate articles.

Click here for more details about evaluating internet sources.

Examples of Reputable Internet Sources

  • The Atlantic Monthly
  • Pew Research Foundation
  • The Guardian
  • NPR
  • The New York Times
  • The Boston Globe (look for their Spotlight pieces, which are incredibly thorough and well-researched)

Know Your Sources

Click the image to see the entire infograph!